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would like to call up two of our committee members on stage if you could all join us please, and if you could all give them a big round of applause so my name is shady and i work with themary's city ever services here in city call hall and i want to welcome great a i think this thure we programmed over ten institutions in the city of san francisco including the air film festival the arab culture and committee center but also with the tamp pais public library to have two events showcasing the rich arab america culture that exists here in the city of san francisco and i want to thank you all for coming and i want to introduce joaquin for resident who ska great member of our community and has helped organize this event. (applause). . thank you very much and good evening everyone on behalf of mayorly who will be joining us in a few moments i want to say thanks to all of you for being here tonight it's always a pleasure for you go to welcome the community into city hall - because you remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community in
that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot more to announce before this month is out, including on our way to the world series. thank you very much. (applause) >> now, if i may introduce our partner in crime here, board president david chiu who is also going to be complimenting us with all of his efforts at the board. come on up, david. (applause) >> good morning. i am incredibly excited to be here today for a couple of reasons. first of all, the hatchery is one of my favorite places in the city. there is truly a bee hive of activity of the newest innovations that san francisco will be famous for. i also love the fact that just a couple of blocks from here is where our san francisco giants are moving on to the world series. but just in this room, all of you are giants and making sure that san francisco is the world champion when it comes to innovation. >>> 13 years ago, i like all of you started a company. i started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it was a company that created technology t
people that don't have a smart phone? you are not allowed us to compete. the cab companies are not allowing us to compete. uber is hiring drivers with the app. people are independent contractors but it should be able to use any app they want; we need a universal app engine need help us do this, help us get the tools to compete with these people. if you read the article yesterday, the comments, the public hates taxis, they hate the tv screens in back, they hate the mta, the puc, drivers refuse to take them to the sunset, refuse to take credit cards. where is the enforcement? why are you allowing companies to block our dispatch systems. we need the -- this is model because that's what they want. we have to have taxis, insurance, regulation. by the way, willie brown -- how many endorsements from the labor council did you get? shame on you. [indiscernible] >> secretary boomer: last person who turned in the speaker card. >> i'm speaking on behalf of my son. he was born, raised, educated, discriminated, and hated like a nigger in his lifetime. his name was excluded [indi
was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
into what he was really like. thank you so much. that was fantastic what you did for us. christopher stevens was obviously an extraordinary human being and contributor. every year at stanford we have a group of what we call national security fellows come. they were roughly army, navy, air force, state department. a couple weeks ago we had a meeting and the first person i called on was an army colonel. i said where were you last? he said in libya. i said did you know christopher stevens? he said everybody knew christopher stevens. he was our leader, fluent in arabic, constructive, positive, doing something, he was our leader. this spontaneous practically eruption from him. he was a foreign service officer. anybody who has served with a foreign service as i did as the secretary of state knows, what a very special group of people this is. they are very able people. dedicated. they work hard for our country. chris was extraordinary and stood out. i thought what image can i think of that might express our way of thinking about him. i thought of the great seal of our republic. i don't know how man
in the association. i think concerning this item, it is important for me and all of us to recognize there are ballot points of view. if we're serious about developing solutions that work for all of us, we have to entertain those points of view and tried to reach consensus. that is the only one that we will create a workable, sustainable solutions. all we're doing is spinning our wheels. my reason for being here is because i truly have come to the conclusion that it is not only based on years on the ground operationally but years of working on development of public policy, working with state governments and justice and lower in corp. -- incarceration and working with other people. a variety of settings. i do not believe that incarceration has taken us where we need to be. i believe the war on drugs has been a failure. when we institutionalize people over extended periods of time, we take low-level offenders in the early stages and harden them and we send them to the university of crime. by the time they get out of prison, they become a bigger social problem. where i come from, whether it is the [unin
remorse. individuals who lacked this ability that most of us take for granted, that is how they feel. hopefully, i did giving you a touch of a psychopathy for a nanosecond. how do we study people like him? we can transport him out from the present to the hospital. one of the things my lab does, we built a really nice trailer in new mexico. here is my trailer. i live in a trailer in mexico. [laughter] this trailer has a really nice mri in it. we work with inmates to volunteer force studies and how to make them better. what we have found is that individuals to have those psychopathic traits, only about a third of all inmates will score really high on the straights. they have reduced gray matter density in these areas. this is the same area where that guy had the tumor. these individuals, control and for all the important things, they are all from pretty average environments. extremely different in terms of structure. does this go towards mitigation? how should it be used? how should this information be used to? i use it to dole out treatment. that is how i thought we would kick start t
with the back of my hand. i said use all 10 fingers, i'll buy you breakfast. checkpoint, security, two. i survived the situation, got on the plane. the point is this, that what's in my head i've never had to apologize for. first thought wrong properly filtered was some kind of rehabilitation or education or part of the c.o. or the p.d. or the d.a., helps first thought wrong become next right thing. you can do it. i can teach the incarcerated population what to want because they always get what they wanted. they wanted more, they got more. they got it, they got it. they want someday, they left with none. they wanted her or him, they got that. i can tell them what to want now. pass first thought wrong, what to want. they do the right work, i can show them how to keep it this time. my boy's safe all day. it's not because of me. it's because of efforts like this. [applause] >> as our panelists take the stage and get seated, let me introduce our discussion. earlier this year, california state senator mark leno introduced legislation that would revise the penalty for simple drug possession unde
anything happens with out fear of having us say, no, we are going to shut it down. we want to work with you to make it happen, but it means as safely as possible. certainly, alcohol always played a role as well as the age of the patrons, and on and on. again, please give us a chance to further develop the trust that we have been building over the last several years. some of the questions that they ask, or issues that they speak to, like the alcohol licensing unit, that is because i heard you with regard to working with licenses, having security plans so there can be one pinpoint that everything can pass through. commanders are the successors and hopefully it will be around a while and always be resourced. it is really important that you take our input and that we come out for a safer event and that people are going to want to come to san francisco and that they will not have any trepidation again, i think the fact that everything is booming right now in san francisco would go a long way to say that we kind of got this thing figured out, but we can always get better. before i leave and pass
. [laughter] >> sort of spices up the meeting. >> for us, i think the most important thing we are offering is something quintessentially san francisco. something that they cannot find anywhere else. we have two fetish fares in san francisco. there are only three other cities in the world that do that. new york, toronto, and berlin. i have been to all three and they are not nearly the same size as well we produced, or nearly as diverse. what we are always thinking about is what we are offering people that is so quintessentially san francisco that we get -- it cannot be gotten anywhere else. we are also told the switching of the entertainment this year. we have dance areas where the slides used to be. i think that for us it is about making sure that people, even if they came to san francisco in particular five years ago, that they are not experiencing the fight -- the same thing. it speaks to one of the priorities. the never-ending city. or something. i do not remember, exactly, but it is the same basic concept. even if you come here several times over and over, you will not have the same ex
that almost 1 in 10 americans struggle with a substance use disorder and that about 1 in 5 americans has a mental health problem. treatment and recovery are the pathway forward for these individuals, a pathway that leads to improved family relationships, health and well-being, hope for the future, and purpose in the sustainment of their recovery. as we hear and see their stories, we learn that recovery happens through many different pathways and that, in every marked by care, acceptance, and respect. this year marks the 22nd year of recovery month , and this year we have broadened it to incorporate recovery from mental health problems along with substance use disorders. recovery should be the common goal, whether one is dealing with mental or substance use disorders, or both. i encourage you to visit recoverymonth.gov to learn more about the celebrations, events, and the 2011 theme: join the voices for recovery. recovery benefits everyone. this is an important effort, to try to make sure that we put the light on recovery from substance abuse and mental illnesses. for the first time, we'v
in developing this. so, as far as creating access to the public, using the open data sets, and creating exposure to neighborhoods that you probably traditionally didn't even think were there, we realized there were 1200 different facilities all through the park -- all through the city as we were going out to explore. and upon our own discovery, and i being a local native, i didn't know about 800 of them. so, as we move forward into the future, taking this, working with some other departments like san francisco arts, we're creating access for people, creating efficiency with the government being able to manage transactions, creating a platform for people to actually interact with the city on a level that hasn't been done before. so, ideally, using the san francisco rec and park, the future san francisco arts app, using our mobile commerce to manage that is creating jobs, revenue, and efficiency for the public and tourists to be able to navigate san francisco in a way that hasn't been done before. thank you. >> all right. (applause) >> so, we're going to show another application from motion launch
will be back. >> all right. our next scene is going to move us from story telling that took place during the hindu temples and india into the mogel time in india this come from hindu and western cultures brought together. when the mogels came from persia to north india they saw the story telling and thought it was a beautiful art form. they were not engaged with the story but saw the beauty in the footwork and hand movement. they brought the dancers into their courts. they were a form of entertainment. so, i want you to put your imagination caps on. we will go from the forest into a beautiful mogel palace. there are velvet carpets and peacocks walking around. there are beautiful paintings and everyone all of you, the audience have come to enjoy the court and the king sits on his thrown in the corner twirling his mustache and he called for his dancers and they come to the room. you are here to be entertained by them. this is called taught. taught is a highly stylized tuning of the mind and body together. you will see very fast turns ending in sharp stances and things with our eyes and eye
that uses drugs is an addict, and not necessarily everybody who uses drugs needs to have treatment. but having said that, people that we often come in contact with will be people who have a severe drug abuse problem and generally they also have a mental health issue problem, there are often housing problems, employment, many other problems, and that's the population we deal with often. and i think that figuring a way to have an intervention so that services are available for those that need it i think is really important. i don't necessarily agree a felony conviction is the vehicle to do so, but i think we have to make sure that as we lower the sanctions here, that we do have the tools and that we have the ability to distinguish between people that have a drug addiction problem, people that are using drugs recreationally and otherwise are a functional person. >> we're going to be taking audience questions shortly, so if you have a question, just try to get the attention of someone in the aisles. ethan, let me ask you this. you know, in california, there are a number of offenses, dr
work. okay thanks a lot:. >> so please everyone, join us for the reception, for the following if he is activities we have a fashion show, as well as some food and accommodations and so please follow us into the hall. thank you. ♪ ♪ >> my name is peter stein. i'm a lifelong friend of milton marks and his family at least going back a generation and it's really my honor today on behalf of milton's family, friends and his wife abbey and his sons and nathan and will and theo and you will be hearing from this afternoon. it's really my honor to welcome you to this commennation of the life and spirit of our irreplaceable friend miltion marks. today we will hear tributes and memories from those that knew milton in many aspects of his life and work, and i think together these memories and tributes will begin to form a mosaic of the multi-dimensional man he was. i use that word because i wrote it yesterday afternoon want thinking of the mosaic of words, and the word cloud that abbey and will and you collaborated on to express the many dimensions of milton markses and you can look
. but in hindsight i can see he was offering his own form of enlightenment. he was guiding us away from the dark time known as the disco era. [ laughter] who knew that chris would work his timeless style for the next 34 years. look at the effect on me, who is wearing the button-down now that. was the first life lesson from chris. stick with the classics, they won't go out of style. that said, my wife has gently advised me the definition of a classic look does not extend to certain flannel shirts from 1982. our next topic on the less sons that we learned from chris back then involve culture. this is beyond the stereotypical fraternity life experience, because i was lucky enough to live with chris and another famous piedmonter austin tichner. talk about enlightening. he dubbed our large room the triple occupancy club. little did i know this came with the added bonus of an extracurricular education in the arts. chris arrived with his stack of lps, many courtesy of his step dad, bob. the chronicle music critic at the time. austin contributed his eclectic theater and comedy recordings and, well, himself.
government awards are incredibly important in san francisco. it's a chance for us to honor the tremendous work that happens in the city and also to honor the individuals who are responsible for some of that success. congratulations to all of our honorees. we're very grateful for your work. let's give a hand for them. [applause] the good government awards also support spur's good government work. it is a central part of our mission. our agenda is admittedly ambitious. we analyze every local measure on the san francisco ballot, which until recently was a pretty formidable task. we participate in most of the major issues of city government from pension and payroll tax reform to some of the most important discussions on how we fund a lot of our public services, whether that finding different revenue streams for our parks, are trying to find new ways to fund public transportation in the city. we're very happy to be working with mayor lee and the board to address a lot of these issues. this will clearly be a busy year for us. another component of our work is connecting the city's robuspro o ass
brought new systems that have saved a lot of tand time and allowed us to give contracts and make payments very fast. please meet jocelyn. [applause] >> first of all, i just want to thank spur and mfac for giving me this honor. i've never really won an award. it does feel like you won the oscars. it's different when you are standing here. i do not even have a written speech. i will speak from the heart. today is a very important day for me and my family because this happens to be my father's death anniversary. i want to dedicate this to my father. my mom flew in tonight. my brother, who works for bart. [applause] i have my nephew, who is here tonight. i want him to see me so he can follow my footsteps sunday to give back to the community. with me here are my managers and supervisors. i also have my longtime friend, jamie, who has been here. i see my former boss here. i have been nominated so many times. it really feels like you won an oscar. lastly, i wanted to thank my husband, who has been not just a husband to me, but he has been my chauffeur -- [laughter] mike coy cook, personal photog
the minimum of 10 dollars, or allow us to have a signposted, only cash. is up to us. we lose the business. you don't. in the people don't have a credit card, we lose the business. >> marcelo fonseca, followed by --[indiscernible] . >> good afternoon sir. >> good afternoon i want to talk again on the -- illegal operation that ms. hyoshi talk about. she talk about a lot of things i want to say. i want to urge you to go after them. they are big threat to our industry. if i listen to you mr. [indiscernible] i don't think you can look the other way. they are threatened this industry. if you don't do anything about it, this medallion treasure could become worthless. they are a major threat to the industry. they are everywhere. they do as they please. it is not fair that we have so many rules and regulations to comply with and they roam the streets as they please. please keep the pressure on them. and to the best you can so we can survive in this industry. thank you. >> chairman nolan: speaker please. >> -- [indiscernible] >> at the last meeting, item 11.7, approved by the board, unilateral ac
>>> my name is chris stevens, i'm the new u.s. ambassador to libya. i had the honor to serve as the envoy to the libyan revolution and i was thrilled to watch the libyan people stand up and demand their rights. now i'm excited to return to libya to continue the great work we've started, building a solid partnership between the united states and libya to help you the libyan people achieve your goals. right now i'm in washington, preparing for my assignment. as i walk around the monuments and memorials commemorating the courageous men and women that made america what it is, i'm reminded we too went through challenging periods, when america was divided by a bitter civil war 150 years ago. president abraham lincoln had the vision to pull us together toward a shared goal of peace and prosperity. growing up in california i didn't know much about the arab world. then after graduating from the university of california at berkeley, i traveled to north africa as peace corps engineer. i worked as an english teacher in morocco two years and quickly grew to love this part of the world. si
premeditated decision-making. that's probably where this evidence is the most useful. we have a standard in criminal law called the reasonable person standard. this fictitious person that we measure everybody's conduct by. we say this is the person, the average person, the average juror, the average individual, the kind of conduct that we would expect an average member of society to live up to. well, as it turns out that none of us are quite average, right. and we might actually be much more like people who we share particular brain structures with or people who we share particular environmental and brain similarities to. so we might need to start thinking about more particularized notions of conduct based on what we would expect of a person who has that type of brain structure who had these types of environmental factors and then start to think about how we want to treat them. do we want to hold those people responsible for their actions or less responsible for their actions. are there certain people who would be better subject to medical treatment instead of incarceration. a
. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get the community together or you have
with the seven buttons and we had seven phones and all of us on the phone all the time. no hold button. our house was always full of people. i see many of you here that became family. you were there all the time, working on elections, and after my dad ran you helped my brother run. the same people helping us, being part of the family, working together for the city. i remember some of the crazy things we did growing up in political life. going to i think it's call -- i don't know if it's called the muni lot or parking lot and where the buss are in the morning so we could put a handout on every seat and bus that was there. i remember standing out in front of markets and it was raining and horrible and saying "will you vote for my dad" and milton loved this. he loved this energy and out of most of us and showed in what he ended up doing. all three kids learned at an early age giving to other people was one of the main things we were put on this world to do. our mom and dad taught us that. milton was a true believer sometimes to his detriment and would take on any power he needed to
, a lot of bucks. -- lack of books. this is what they are teaching us. not saying that it is a total reason for why it and others turn out the way that we turned out, but it plays a part. just like i have to be held accountable for the choices i make, and so does a society. >> i keep hearing the term gang. in the black community in the bay area, it is a community, it is not a gang. you can move up in their ranks as if you are working for apple or ibm. you can move from a regular employee to ceo. in the black community, it is not like this. it is not structured like that. there is no one at sagging or telling you how to operate. there is a term in the black community called a one-man army. it is someone who acts alone. he did not bring anybody with them, he is called a one-man army. he does not have to report to anybody. none of that. i do not know if that is worse than a hierarchy. at the end of the day, i mean, it is not a gang. it is a community. i know that i am not going to get the word again abolished from the media, but i want to clarify. as long as you keep putting a label on
. there is no application fee. if you are interested in an application or information, i have brochures, or you can give us a call. >> thank you. next is marked with wells fargo. >> hello, i work for wells fargo bank. i cover the northern california region. i usually focus on about $350 -- $350,000 of sbe loans. last year, for 2010, i did 43 loans. so we are lending. i usually focus on six different types of loans. start-ups, business acquisitions, real estate purchases with ti's, working capital, a partner buyouts, business expansion. when i am looking at a potential loan, i use the standard five c's of credit. the first one is character. what we are looking for is a minimum score around 640. we would like to say no recent bankruptcy foreclosures, bankruptcies, tax liens. if we see a loan that has been modified, we would like to see a reason it was modified, what ever reason it may be. it cannot be, i did not want to pay that payment any more. the second c, conditions. basically, how precise will the money be used? we are looking at a business plan. when you look at a business plan, that is just a start u
using these principles. [applause] in fact san francisco was recently recognized by the world green building council as having the greenest building policy by any local level in the year 2011 and we just began implementing our existing commercial energy performance ordinance which helps private property owners lower energy use. through san francisco's program green sf we are making it easier for property owners to secure financing for green building upgrades and as can you see green buildings has become the standard rather than the exception. for our public libraries to affordable housing units, even to the home of our world series giants and their structure our buildings are achieving lead certification at a rapid pace and our san francisco public utilities commission has won smartest building in the world and we have honors such as the greenest city in north america, the walkable city, and the best green policies, the green tech of north america and forbes recognized that san francisco has the most green jobs in the united states. that's jobs. that's one of the most important t
. they voted for us to get 3 medallions. and you have never carried that. you take money from us and give it to the muni, who already has a surplus, giving away free rides and god knows what else. because muni has such a high pension; we get nothing, you take money from our pockets and give us nothing in return. it is disgraceful and criminal for you to do this. (applause) >> chairman nolan: next speaker. >> good afternoon. >> mark brewer, united taxicab workers. this is one of the bitterest days in the more than 20 years that i have been active on these issues; and i have seen many bitter base especially since his body took over. how can you listen to the heart-felt please, the angry-please and turn them away? and you will. you are not an objective decision-making policy. you are group that has your own interests, that conflict with the interests of the people in this room. and you are simply turning away from them, and feeding your own coffers. just to give you a figure, i added what you have thus far gain from medallions sales, and what you expect again and leases, it's over
are special to us and gives us the opportunity to recognize the unsung heroes whose work goes unnoticed and it's an opportunity to share with the larger community and i would like to thank the native american organizing community and the health center, the health center of santa clara, our office and i would like to make a special note of one of our employees who has been diligent for serving communities in san francisco and lois figueroa and thank you for the work that you do on behalf of the communities and of course you recognize the american aids project. [applause] to borrow from the president's words and our san francisco and our bay area community moves forward because of you. we move forward because of you, and the honorees and your work that rerecognize tonight and recognizes the triumph that left from depression to the greatest heights of hope. the belief that each of us will pursue our dreams we are a san francisco, a bay area family and we rise or fall together as one nation and one people, and so i would like to invite up to the stage to receive what we present in recognition of
to transfer the medallion, and they had a ramp medallion, we don't want us to be bought and sold; those are important to ensure accessible transportation. would allow that person to exchange it for an available sedan medallion, and give the ramp medallion the somebody else on the list and that person could transfer the sedan medallion in its place. that seems to be a reasonable approach for ramp medallion holders; we have to talk to the industry about this and make a policy decision. i'm not sure whether or not that will require further legislation. i have to talk the city attorney's office about that. i'm glad that you asked the question. begins with the opportunity to announce that we will have a town hall meeting on the subject on monday the 26th, will discuss this with industry and come up with a proposal is in as we can. one thing we do we do recognize is the uncertainty, is not something we want to maintain. >> chairman nolan: i would ask question. several people raised the safety issue and the lack of inspectors. can you comment on that? >> we have 4 taxi investigators,
the hours it will bring to us, it quite a part from the food we will put on the table and the house payments and so on. that's one of the reasons this project really excites us and it's a dramatic project. however, we are happy to try to minimize the drama of actually building the project and this is what this particular agreement d a lot of things are in this particular agreement and i think it's a real accomplishment, something that will provide us a practical and effective means of addressing local hire andet going san franciscans to work so thank you. [applause] >> so our final speaker is really the foremost community lead in the local hire movement and that is environment commissioner josh arsay. [applause] >> thank you. thank you mayor lee. thank you warriors. thank you web core hunt and those that will build us and jesse hunt and i would like our community partners to come up. we work together in coalition and when we have the opportunity we would like to do this. charity cultural center -- i saw david. mother jackson, the god mother of bay view hunter's point. dan marcos and bay
dog. we support active recreational uses and adamantly oppose any move to give sharp park to [speaker not understood]. it is suing san francisco to try to force us to close the sharp park golf course and give it to the gg & a. the lawsuit is in the courts right now, but preliminary [speaker not understood]. this resolution will help their lawsuit. a cynical point by them to get you supervisors to do what they don't seem able to get the courts to do, to push their extremist plan to close sharp park golf course and give it to the [speaker not understood]. you shouldn't make it easier for people suing the city to win their lawsuit. stay out of it and vote no. you should not assert pressure on planning while an e-i-r is being developed. that is the intent to change the results of the nap e-i-r. don interfere and vote no on this resolution. the e-i-r in question is supposed to be for the natural area management plan, not just parts of it. you should not allow extremists with a stake in this to pick and choose which parts of the overall nap plan are considered in the e-i-r. if it is to have
is the san francisco district director of the u.s. small business administration. the small business administration covers not only san francisco proper but the bay area. the severed his third district is responsible for a business loan portfolio of 12,000 loans worth $4.2 billion. in 2009, the sba approved $500 million in lending. next, we have the executive director of the san francisco small business office. she was in san francisco in 1986 to open the buffalo exchange limited store, and in the 13 years she worked for buffalo exchange, tennis district manager, she held her open the company from four to 11 stores. in 2009, the mayor appointed her as executive director to the office of small businesses. next, we have the ceo of opportunity funds. he has combined his background as a community organizer with an education from stanford to develop an innovative, not-for- profit financial incision that uses market principles to affect systemic change. it operates one of the nation's largest individual development, programs, a leading provider of micro loans in california, and has a robus
. for us, the capacity for us to do the smaller side is not there as much as it is for them. on getting a loan through my side of the bank, i do not require an account to do that. we would like to have it, but i do not require it. >> last question for the opportunity fund and a critic representative. are you a cdfi? is san francisco and s.p.a. in support of cdfi's being established in san francisco? >> yes, we are. we were founded in 1999 with a small business loan. that is how we started our tenderloin office. >> opportunity fund is a certified cdfi, so we are providing a benefit to low and moderate-income communities. he is the city establishing support for new cdfi's? >> mark wanted to address that, in support of cdfi's in the city. >> we have a wealth of partners in the city. s.p.a. is just now rolling out a program for r -- will be the case by the summer. let me get one last point and on the question about relationships to lenders. the question was, do have to have an account with a bank in order to get a loan? may answer is no, but the real answer to it is certainly want to do tha
people to use transit, take taxis, ride bikes. we will resume construction on stockton after the first of the year. for those who have to drive we want folks to use sf park garages, rates are competitive the parking these garages as opposed to being out in the street blocking taxis, muni, while looking for a parking space. we want to encourage everybody on muni - and really everybody out in the public right-of-way to be aware of your surroundings, to be conscious of what is happening around you. we still have a fairly high degree of pickpocketing, and that sort of activity happening on muni, particularly in tourist heavy areas. people should be mindful and a distracted by portable devices. we want everyone to be safe and want the cities businesses to thrive. church and debose project, last weekend shutdown, we are in substantial completion. the last bit of work that requires a shutdown was replacing track in the portal, connecting the mainline up to churchill and debose. we had recently found the track in that area was worn, and reduce the speed in that area. the main piece of
that come from us in the financial interest of the sfmta. the prospect of future caps depends on the ability to switch ramp medallion for regular medallions. the current ramp medallion will yield 100,000 a month to the sfmta. it should be recalled that during the pilot program, a regular medallion holder, some of whom had recently gotten them, sold them for 250,000. [indiscernible] we understand the need of the sfmta to secure income. >> chairman nolan: - thank you sir. next speaker please. >> secretary boomer: i diane maleck. >> good afternoon, my name is [indiscernible], i have been living in san francisco for 29 years; i respectfully reject this proposal. i have been on the waiting list for almost 14 years. i send you my proposal. here is my proposal. to serve the public we don't need 24/7 cabs in san francisco; please issue 500 big-time medallion, for $50,000 each, it would generate 25 million for the sfmta. when the build of the business on the off-peak time we can work those medallions to the regular medallions for example 100 medallions a year during the cou
of using profanity but because it was a different lapd. it was rumored that the mexican mafia was allowed to meet in his church and that he held guns for gang members. and he was helping gang members across the border. i am certain he knew where the body of jimmy hoffa was buried when you got done listening to the rumors. now, the lapd uses home with industries as an integral part of its anti-gang efforts. not all of them, not 9000 members, but i can tell you this, homeboy industries have their annual benefit to honor people in the community as well as former gang members, the person they honored was chief charlie of the lapd. unless you think that was an anomaly, the year before they honored the sheriff. there is an alliance between community-based organizations, and law-enforcement. this is not enough. there has also been in the streets, ongoing, a relationship, a delicate one, a thoughtful one between the loss angeles police department and gang intervention. interventionists are former gang members. they have to be very careful about how they play out the relationship. they do not want
being used to address these issues being brought up by the neighborhoods affected by the project. and that's incredibly important. and, so, while speed can be sometimes a bad thing, that a slow process in and of itself is not necessarily a good thing either. that just because something has slowed down doesn't mean that that project is then deliberated appropriately. as long as the appropriate deliberations is happening, that is more than enough. and that's what's happening right now. so, again, we'd like to continue the momentum behind the warriors arena project and hopefully continue to see this project move forward and addressing these issues as well. thank you. >> thank you, mr. ryan. if there is no other public comment, and through the chair, we can close public comment. >> close the public comment. >> thank you. if i could just make some concluding comments and then turn to my colleagues. i have another meeting. i want to thank all the city departments and the warriors and also many of our community for being here today. i just wanted to state one of the public commenters ha
't physically with us anymore he's still here with his friends and contributions he made to san francisco and every other community where he lived, and through abbey, nathan, theo and will, and the rest of his family whom he loved most of all. we loved milton and we miss him terribly but we will never forget him. thank you. [applause] >> milton never stopped advocating for what he believed that the kreakdz and maintenance of san francisco's forestry program was civic involvement and support and i think milton would appreciate that if we knock on supervisor's doors and do some advocacy since we're all here anyway. although milton didn't relish the work he had to do in these halls he knew it was necessary for the canopy outside to grow and thrive and let's remember where his legacy really lies and it gives me solace to know that his sons will see him imprint in san francisco every time they walk down the street. let's all look up and remember him this way. thank you. [applause] >> we get to meet milton's niece zoey marks. >> i was think about the past 19 years with my uncle milton in pr
constructive steps to remove the barriers. the ada gives us some guidance on that. readily achievable says it can be done quickly and easily without a whole lot of steps. feasible means that it may require a lot more money, a lot more alteration to get that done. under the ada, you need to be surveying your property and putting together both a short- term plan and a long-term plan. the short term plan is going to be the readily achievable solution. the long-term plan could take 20 years. i do not know. your business might not be making huge profits. you may need to be saving money for the long term. but it is your obligation to plan for the long term as well as the short term. the ada has a set of priorities that guide you on how you will be serving your property. the ada says a certain party of getting in the front door, but you are logical, you want your customers to access your services. be that steps, be that ramps, if the door is not wide enough, if the landing is not level enough. priority two is actually travel. once you get into your business and start speculating the wits of your
that this legislation is good -- good legislation. there's no conditional use requirement to have this. a lot of people today want to have food, drink, and be able to have some music. how can we get the limited live entertainment excluded from the know amplified or no live entertainment excluded on the transfers? >> that is going to mostly driven locally. most of the conditions you'll ever see on an abc license are because we rely, to a great extent, on the police department and local officials to determine what is best for their communities. i'm not trying to pin this on you guys or blame you guys, but we do try to work with you. we do not tend to want to overrule the police department very often. now that said, i get a fair number of petitions and appeals to me. typically, they are from the neighbors. i want to see that there is actually a practical problem posed -- that the condition is there to solve, not that this is the way the things have been or maybe there's someone who is satisfied by what is potentially wrought by having live entertainment. it is always a case by case. generally, very defere
just grew up together. there were no handouts and no one told us how to conduct ourselves. and tell us what to wear. someone could have a school fight, and we may be at the mall, and see the person we have a fight with. the army and navy have their bar fights. i did not see this as being a game, or a community. supporting each other, this may have been in a negative way. i did not have a stable household. many of them do not of their fathers are, where their father is dead. in their return, the block i gave up -- this is who i looked up to. he had a notorious reputation. there was the violence and in return, we had the pros and cons for that. a lot of people would mess with me because of who my father was -- to my brother was. they became my enemies. it was not a choice. this is just how was. let's go get him. and it comes to the place, you get tired of running. i did not see this as being wrong. what people defined as a gang, that must be a gang member right there. i have tattoos on my arm and neck and hand, and none of them are getting associated. they all tell personal story in my l
what the accrediting commission is telling us to do. he had been right. what does it tell you about a man who after brain surgery and many treatments kept coming to meetings. he kept showing up to meetings because he wanted to fix the college. he wanted to right a ship. what does it tell you about a man who i had the pleasure of driving home in his last several months? and i said "milton are you really going to run again?" and he said "yes" and i said "good" and we have work to do. we still have work to do". that tells me he's not just a good man and a good servant. it tells me he was a great human being. that's what that tells me about milton marks. milton has passed, but long will live his legacy of public service of courage, of accountability, of restoring and believing in what it means to have public trust in your institutions, why that is so important. he was a great mentor, and i couldn't have imagined or thought of anyone better to sit next to in my first years in public office. he taught me how to be a public servant and human being and most importantly how to be a g
meltzer, steve dixon, and jack hirsch man. >> you can black as out of the press, blog and arrest us, tear gas, mace, and shoot us, as we know very well, you will, but this time we're not turning back. we know you are finished. desperate, near the end. hysterical in your flabbergastlyness. amen. >> after the readings, the crowd headed to a reception upstairs by wandering through the other gallery rooms in the historic home. the third floor is not usually reserved for just parties, however. it is the stage for live performances. ♪ under the guidance of musical curators, these three, meridian has maintained a strong commitment to new music, compositions that are innovative, experimental, and sometimes challenging. sound art is an artistic and event that usually receives short shrift from most galleries because san francisco is musicians have responded by showing strong support for the programming. ♪ looking into meridian's future, she says she wants to keep doing the same thing that she has been doing since 1989. to enlighten and disturbed. >> i really believe that all the arts have a se
us and finding the young people that will be the up and coming leaders. it's hard to think of myself as a leader in the community because i am taught not to think about myself or brag about myself except in prayer. we pray for ourselves to first so we can be stronger to pull other people up, but to pay attention to myself goes against the way i was taught growing up. we don't brag about it. we just do it and that's our job and just do it. it's important to always do community work because we are teaching somebody without knowing and somebody is watching us and it keeps our community strong. [applause] >> thank you. thank you everybody. i made myself cry again just watching it, but thank kqmd and as i said in the video here it was really hard for me to accept this because i don't think myself and martha did convincing and remember there is always somebody watching. somebody young or old is watching and we have to carry ourselves in a good way because maybe somebody wants to be like us one day. i thank my co-workers for coming. i gave this little speech a couple weeks ago and
. i am done. that was his turning point. call it a turning point, called the teachable moment. use whatever terminology that you want. that is where we need to be present. when i say we, i mean, we. at that turning point, at that moment of truth, that teachable moment, it is imperative that resources be brought to bear. now, what are the two most impressive resources that are brought to bear at that moment. there are two major forces that helped gang members change.
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